March makes it abundantly clear that we are cyclical beings. Light and dark, old and new, outspoken at times, quietly reserved in others. Passing this through a more philosophical lens it’s easy to come to terms with our own human experience. We will fluctuate and contradict ourselves as we live out our time here – as we learn to adapt to change and take on more relevant versions of ourselves often motivated by specific context.

This is the month that typically involves either a gigantic fall from grace – finding yourself stuck in the monotony of day to day reality after the hype of summer, or it can be a time of spacious processing and the deep awareness you craved amid the previous months as they passed by.

In honour of this, the theme of this month’s links list is dedicated to the impact our surroundings can have on us. Sourcing out interviews, discussions and ideas that explore the way we occupy our environments, and subsequently navigate our roles within them and society at large.

 

 

 

Environments –

 

1.

The Barbican was an iconic Avant Garde architectural scheme established in 1982,  motivated by the desire to get the heart of central London beating again. The success was in bringing life back into urban living, and allowing citizens to have the best of both worlds: access to an intimate and communal way of existing, all whilst being within one of the largest metropolitan centres in the world. Close to work, close to resources, close to culture, close to community…What more could you want?

Watch HERE.

 

2.

Dan Hikuroa is a new kiwi legend, to put it simply. He wants us to rethink our river infrastructure by infusing ancient Maori principles and beliefs into our approach. This interview aired on RNZ 10 days ago but we thought it was well worth a decent recap.

Listen HERE.

 

3.

Milan’s Poldi Pezzoli Museum is the former home of one of the city’s most prolific art collectors. Not only are its aesthetic bones impressive, but the story behind it and the pieces that now fill its rooms give regular citizens access to some of the most timeless minds in Italian art history. Annalisa Zanni has dedicated most of her life to modernising and maintaining the museum – living and breathing every aspect of it since the 1970’s. This is her story to tell.

Browse HERE.

 

 

….And our roles within them – 

 

1.

“Dynamics change, and we’re all learning how to change with them. And I think there is a way to be compassionate with it, because to be resentful and to lead with the resentment for what has come years before is difficult to affect change with. But egregious behaviour is egregious behaviour and criminal activity is criminal activity, so let’s put a light there…immediately.” 

Laura Dern knows the ins and outs of the film industry like the back of her hand. Growing up daughter to two of the most esteemed actors during their prime, she’s seen the way the industry has modelled the behaviours that are fuelling some of the most prevalent social justice discussions we engage in today. As these come to the surface and bring with them a hunger for much larger questions to be answered, Laura makes a point of sharing some wisdom from the perspective of an actor / artist, and also a mother. One of the best interviews considering the zeitgeist of now that we have stumbled across in a rather long time. 

Listen HERE.

 

 

2.

An incredibly poignant musing on motherhood and what it means to be a modern woman today – grieving versions of herself that may not yet have had a chance to be realised, and how society looks on as she stands in the waiting.

“Biological clocks, without acknowledgement or even a simple introduction, seem to begin their reign with haste. An abrupt panel of loudmouthed judges link age with fertility, scoring accordingly and offering their opinions, wanted or not. Typically marking women on their childbearing activities, these clocks tick similarly to other time-tracking and goal-keeping tools we use to assess our success and happiness.”

Read HERE.

 

3.

A universal priority and perspective adjustment from Thoreau is always very welcomed…The wisdom of this writer’s consideration is comfort to anyone feeling burnt out, frustrated and dispirited by our culture of constant news consumption and frightening media input.

Read HERE. 

 

 

Image one: The Barbican, London.

 

 

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